Looking for IT in India

A few days ago Jack Schwille, assistant dean for international studies in education, sent an email out to all faculty and students at the college of education announcing a talk by me titled: “Help Punya find IT in India?” This presentation was to be fifth in the series “Lessons Learned and New Directions in International Research in Education.” He followed this by plastering the entire college with flyers stating “Help Punya find IT.

This cryptic series of announcements became quite a sensation. Continue reading →

Faculty Development by Design

Faculty Development by Design: Integrating Technology in Higher Education. A volume in the series: Research Methods for Educational Technology. Series Editor(s): Walt Heinecke, University of Virginia

Edited by: Punya Mishra, Matthew J. Koehler, Yong Zhao
This book attempts to offer not just a bird’s-eye view of the communities of designers project, but also to help identify broad themes and issues that can inform discussions and policies of technology integration at other institutions.Continue reading →

On becoming a website

I wrote this essay a few years ago, around the time I was going up for tenure. I saw writing this as a welcome change from the usual academic stuff I had been writing. I was bored and tired of taking on this third-person, impersonal intellectual voice and just wanted to write something for the pleasure of it. I wanted it to be intellectually honest but not “academic.” In short I wanted to write something that I would like to read (and would enjoy writing). The result was this essay which was published in FirstMonday (after a year-long wait). Continue reading →

The carving of Carver

Creativity and collaboration. Authorship and editorial prerogative, who has the final say, and who should receive the credit?

Here is an article in Drexel University’s Magazine “The Smart Set” about the role Raymond Carver’s editor played in “finalizing” his stories. As the article says:

Mr. Lish, working at Knopf, took the stories that Carver sent him and he hacked away at them, mercilessly. He liked the stories as they were, no doubt, but he saw something else in them as well, something harder and more pure. Continue reading →

Psychoanalyzing Bush

I picked up Jacob Weisberg’s The Bush Tragedy from the library and finished reading it over the past day and a half. I have never been a fan of Bush, mainly because I was troubled, from the very beginning, by his lack of curiosity, and his unwillingness to learn. Weisberg has been a somewhat moderate fan of Bush, though he is now quite disappointed with what has happened in the past seven years. This book is his attempt to understand what went wrong and why. Continue reading →

AACTE Major Forum on TPCK

Matt and I will be at New Orleans in a few weeks presenting at a major forum organized as a part of the AACTE conference. The title of the major forum is When Multiple Technologies Take Learning to a higher level: the technological Pedagogical content Knowledge (TPCK) Framework and Curricular Exemplars. This will also coincide with the release of the TPCK handbook, which should be a lot of fun. Continue reading →

The Innocent

I first read Ian McEwan many years ago (in the 80’s I think) when he wrote grim and macabre novels and short stories, full of strange dark humor. I found him somewhat interesting but not enough to seek out his books. And then, years later, this past fall I read Atonement, and it just blew me away. In quick succession I finished Saturday and now The Innocent. Continue reading →

Mishra & Koehler, 2006

The Mishra & Koehler (2006) article is the first and somewhat definitive presentation of the TPCK framework. The complete reference and abstract are given below, as is a link to the original article [pdf format].

Mishra, P., & Koehler, M. J. (2006). Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge: A new framework for teacher knowledge. Teachers College Record 108 (6), 1017-1054.Continue reading →

Scrivener vs. Writer

A NYTimes article on word-processing versus writing (or scrivenering??): An interface of one’s own. What stood out was this description of writing being more than just the putting of words on a screen — but rather of seeing it this complex, often non-linear activity…

Scriveners, unlike Word-slaves, have florid psychologies, esoteric requirements and arcane desires. They’re artists. They’re historians. With needs.