Rethinking technology & creativity, now in paper form!

Tech Trends Covers Tech Trend Article photos

For the past 4 years, the Deep-Play group has written a series of articles for the journal Tech Trends under the broad rubric of Rethinking Technology & Creativity in the 21st Century. The first article was published in 2014 and we are still going strong. Over that time we have written 23 articles with 4 more in various stages of preparation. Writing these articles has been a wonderful experience, allowing all of us to play with ideas and, most importantly, to keep writing. There is a lot to be said for the discipline required to meet a deadline every two months.

The interesting thing is that in all these years, I have never held any of these 20+ issues of the journal in my hand. Not once. That changed this morning when I got into my office – and there was a packet with the past 4 issues – each with an article in the series. I must say it felt good to hold those volumes and skim through them. So I guess despite my digital dependence, there still is something special in seeing your name in print, or actually touching a “real” journal

For those interested the entire series is here: Rethinking Technology and Creativity

 

TPACK Newsletters (#28, #29 & 30)

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In the rush of summer and the move to Arizona I missed posting #28 and #29 of the TPACK newsletter, and before I knew it, #30  was here as well. Well here are links to the PDFs of all three newsletters

Once again thanks to Judi Harris for all the work that goes into curating these resources and putting them together on a regular basis. All previous issues of the newsletter can be found here

The song remains the same: Old article holds true even today

As I dig through my Research Gate requests I realize that I have missed out on putting some of my articles onto my website. Here is another one (and on a side note, it never hurts to make a Led Zeppelin reference in your paper – actually the paper starts with a quote from the band!):

Mishra, P., Koehler, M. J., & Kereluik, K. (2009). The song remains the same: Looking Back to the Future of Educational Technology. TechTrends, 53, 5. p. 48-53.

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The process of design: A quote

I have been a huge fan of Bill Atkinson, creator of MacPaint, one of the key players in developing the GUI for the original Macintosh including coming up with things as the double-click, the menu bar, marquee selection and lots of interface ideas we take for granted today. His most impressive achievement, personally speaking, was Hypercard, which more than anything is responsible for my getting into the field of educational technology. So when I came across this quote below, about the design process, I felt the need to create a visual design to better represent it. Here is the quote, and the design below (you can click on it to get a larger version).

The process of [software] design really is one where you start with a vague notion of what you’re trying to make, and that vague notion slowly congeals and gets better defined. As you work with it more, it gets to the point where it is something, but as you try it you realize, “You know, I’ve kind of missed the mark here. This is sort of what I want to do, but what I really want is more like that! — Bill Atkinson 

Atkinson-quote

 

By Design & by Chance: New Publication

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Dinner in Bangalore with some of the key
members of the MSU-APU partnership *

One of the highlights of my career at MSU was the partnership we built between the College of Education and the Azim Premji University / Azim Premji Foundation. This partnership now nearing 6 years has transformed my life in many ways and has led to some powerful and deeply meaningful friendships. It has been a wonderful journey and, as in life, some of what happened was planned and some of it sort of just happened. So, it is no surprise that when we wrote a book chapter about this partnership we titled it  By Design and by Chance: The Story of One International Partnership (reference, abstract and link below):

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Ganesh, new ambigram, & old video

One of the big parts of my life over the past decade or more, has been the Ganesh Festival celebrations in Lansing with friends and family—Good food and good times. Of course this year I have to miss all the fun – being here in Phoenix. I have kept up with all the activities vicariously – by email and text messages, but it is not the same. So I decided to dust off an old ambigram I had created and polish it to share with my Lansing-area friends. This is a 180-degree, rotational chain ambigram for the word “Ganesh” that can be read left to right, from the top or the bottom! Enjoy.

[More about the mathematics underlying ambigrams can be found here. More about the Ganesh festival here. Hi-res version of image to print here]

ganeshGanesh is also one of the most fun deities in the Hindu pantheon and one of the most creatively represented. A few years ago I had made a video about the multiple representations of Ganesh. Watch The many manifestations of Ganesha below:

 

Multitasking & the learner: New publication

multitasking

One of the myths of the new digital generation is that they are natural multi-taskers. The evidence, however, indicates that multi-tasking is detrimental to performance and success, and  though we may try delude ourselves, the fact of the matter is that, we do worse on most measures of performance while multi-tasking. How can this be corrected? One approach that makes sense is to improve awareness of this finding.  But does increasing aware of this problematic phenomenon actually help reduce multitasking? This study, led by doctoral student Colin Terry, seeks to answer this question:

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Hello ASU

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Today is my first official day at Arizona State University. Though I have been here in the Phoenix area for a few days already, I truly start today. As I had written in my earlier post, I will be the new Associate Dean for Scholarship (as in scholarly and research activities) at the Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College here at ASU. I will also be a professor in the Division of Academic Leadership & Innovation.

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I am both excited and nervous about this new opportunity but overall I am looking forward to this next stage in my career. My website will be moving soon to a new hosting service – but the punyamishra.com address should still work. I want to thank the people here at ASU and Dave Dai’s team at MSU for making this website transition relatively smooth (at least so far).

My email address will change of course – my new address is Punya.Mishra[at]asu.edu, though I do check my msu.edu address on a somewhat regular basis.

Goodbye MSU!

goodbyemsu

I started working at Michigan State University on the 15th of August, 1998. Today exactly 18 years later I bid MSU farewell to take up a new position as Associate Dean of Scholarship at the Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College atArizona State University.

These last 18 years have been wonderful, both personally and professionally. MSU is where I came into my own as a scholar and researcher. Michigan was where we settled down and built a network of close friends and colleagues. My son was 2 when we moved here and my daughter was born a year later. He is today a junior at the other university in Michigan and she is a senior in high school. Wonderful years! Michigan State University (and the state of Michigan) have been home, intellectually, socially and personally.

I know for sure that a part of me will always be a Spartan, will always be a Michigander.

It is impossible to capture these past 18 years in a few words, so many wonderful memories created and so people, friends and colleagues, to thank, so I will not even try. I will just say, you know who you are, and know that I treasure all the wonderful times we had together. Thank you for being part of this journey. Know, also, that I will miss you.

… but also remember that these days we are all a click or a phone call away. So keep in touch.

The tensions inherent in creativity: Interview with Mark Runco

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The next article in our series (Rethinking technology and creativity for the 21st century) for the journal Tech Trends is now available online. This article has an interview with Dr. Mark Runco, Distinguished Research Fellow of the American Institute of Behavioral Research and Technology, a Professor at the University of Georgia, and an internationally recognized scholar of creativity. Read more by following the link below:

Richardson, C., Mishra, P., & the Deep-Play Research Group (2016). Navigating the Tensions Inherent in Understanding Creativity: An Interview with Mark RuncoTech Trends (60)5, 415-418.

TPACK in Spanish

Back in 2013 we (Koehler, Mishra and Cain) published an updated version of an article on TPACK.

Koehler, M. J., Mishra, P., & Cain, W. (2013). What is Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK)Journal of Education (193)3, 13-20.

This article was then picked up, translated into Spanish and published in the journal Virtualidad, Educación y Ciencia (Virtuality, Education and Science). Complete citation and link below:

Koehler, M.J., Mishra, P., & Cain, W. (2015). ¿Qué son los Saberes Tecnológicos y Pedagógicos del Contenido (TPACK)? Virtualidad, Educación y Ciencia, (6)10. [Alternatively  you can access is directly at https://revistas.unc.edu.ar/index.php/vesc/article/view/11552/11983]

Why teachers should care about beauty in science

illustration1-smallFigure 1. “We are a way for the universe to know itself” – Carl Sagan
Science is one of the most powerful ways to engage with the beauty of the universe.
We use science to understand the cosmos and, in the process,
find beauty in our understandings and representations of it. 

•  •  •

iWonder: Rediscovering School Science is a new journal of science education focusing on middle school science teachers, published by the Azim Premji University. The second issue of the journal just appeared – and it has the first article in a series titled Research to Practice, that I am co-editing with my colleague Angie Calabrese Barton. Written by Rohit Mehta and Sarah Keenan, you can find the article, complete citation and abstract below:

Mehta, R., & Keenan, S. (2016, June). Why teachers should care about beauty in science education. iWonder: Rediscovering School Science (1) 2, 83-86.

Abstract: This article explores the role of beauty in science education. The authors use research in science education to highlight the importance of teachers consciously making connections to aesthetic aspects in science. Caring about beauty in science can inspire a sense of wonder and curiosity among students.

Incidentally, one of the most fun parts of writing this article was having to create the illustrations that accompany the prose. Both these images were created with resources shared freely under Creative Commons licenses, and labeled for reuse with modification. The first illustration is given above (at the beginning of the blog post) and the second one is below.

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Figure 2.Connecting across scales of beauty.
From the grandeur of the cosmos to the intricacies of sub-atomic particles,
beauty is all around us. These infinities (of the very small and the very large)
are bridged by the human intellect—the beauty of mathematics at work.

Infusing creativity & technology in education (new publication)

csik-diag

Danah Henriksen, Petra Fisser and I have a new article (complete reference and link below). This article emerged from a Thematic Working group on Creativity in a technology enhanced curriculum that the three of us led at EduSummIT 2015 (see more here). This article is part of a special issue of the Journal of Educational Technology and Society devoted to EdusummIT 2015. You can download the entire issue here or just our article below:

Henriksen, D., Mishra, P., & Fisser, P. (2016). Infusing Creativity and Technology in 21st Century Education: A Systemic View for Change. Educational Technology & Society, 19 (3), 27–37.

Abstract: In this article, we explore creativity alongside educational technology, as fundamental constructs of 21st century education. Creativity has becoming increasingly important, as one of the most important and noted skills for success in the 21st century. We offer a definition of creativity; and draw upon a systems model of creativity, to suggest creativity emerges and exists within a system, rather than only at the level of individual processes. We suggest that effective infusion of creativity and technology in education must be considered in a three-fold systemic manner: at the levels of teacher education, assessment and educational policy. We provide research and practical implications with broad recommendations across these three areas, to build discourse around infusion of creative thinking and technology in 21st century educational systems.

Illustration credit: Individual – Field – Domain and their interactions to determine Where is Creativity? (Illustration by Punya Mishra, based on Csikszentmihalyi, 1997)

Good teaching is good design

lessbutbetter-dieterramsI just came across Dieter Rams: ten principles for good design and was immediately struck by how closely they paralleled what is essential for good teaching. All one has to do is replace the word “design” with “teaching” and I think we get 10 pretty good principles to follow (or think about). This is a game I have played before in this post about the need for new educational research paradigms / approaches building on some comments by Don Norman about the need to new design research paradigms / approaches (see Rethinking Ed Tech Research).

Here are Rams’ 10 principles with the word design replaced by teaching (and in a couple of cases lightly edited to make sense in this new context).

  1. Good teaching is innovative
  2. Good teaching is useful
  3. Good teaching is aesthetic
  4. Good teaching is understandable
  5. Good teaching is unobtrusive
  6. Good teaching is honest
  7. Good teaching is long-lasting
  8. Good teaching is thorough down to the last detail
  9. Good teaching is environmentally friendly
  10. Good teaching is as little teaching as possible.

He is also known for saying “Less but better” which, if you ask me, is a good slogan for teaching as well.

New TPACK book chapter

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The  Commonwealth Educational Media Centre for Asia (CEMCA), New Delhi, recently published a book titled “Resource Book on ICT Integrated Teacher Education.” Edited by Dr. Manas Ranjan Panigrahi it is available as an Open Educational Resource (OER) from the CEMCA website.

The book has 5 chapters, including on by co-authored by a team here at MSU. Complete reference (with link to the book) and table of contents below.

Panigrahi, M.R. (2016). (Ed.) Resource Book on ICT Integrated Teacher Education. New Delhi: Commonwealth Educational Media Centre for Asia. Available online here.

Table of Contents

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Hot of the press: eBook on Creativity, Technology & Teacher Education

Creativity-Tech-TE-book-cover

Danah Henriksen and I recently edited a special issue of the Journal of Technology and Teacher Education (Volume 23, Number 3, July 2015) devoted to Creativity, Technology and Teacher Education (see blog post here). This special issue has now been issued as an eBook by AACE. Here is the complete citation, along with links to the book page on LearnTechLib and the complete pdf, as well as an abstract:

Henriksen, D., & Mishra, P. (2016). Creativity, technology & teacher education. Waynesville, NC: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). [LearnTechLib link | Link to complete eBook PDF]

Abstract: This book focuses on research related to creativity, technology and teacher education, examining these topics through a range of approaches and ideas across multiple contexts. The volume itself began as a special issue of the Journal of Technology & Teacher Education. The chapters in this book speak to different aspects of theory, research, and practice – in attempts to go beyond the specifics or intricacies of tools, and towards a broader framework. This provides guiding ideas and takeaways that can inform the future of teacher education. One of the strengths of this volume is the rich manner in which these ideas are explored across different subject matters, classroom and learning contexts, technologies, teacher roles, pedagogical approaches, and theoretical frameworks.

Keywords and complete table of contents, below the jump:

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Creativity as Resistance: New article

resistanceImage credit: tshirtgifter.com

The next article in our series (Rethinking technology and creativity for the 21st century) for the journal Tech Trends is now available online. This article has an interview with Dr. Shakuntala Banaji, currently Associate Professor and the Program Director for the Masters in Media, Communication, and Development at the London School of Economics. Her work “spans multiple areas of research and instruction, including creativity, cinema, civic participation, and critical examinations of media.” Read more by following the link below:

Good, J., Mishra, P., & the Deep-Play Research Group (2016). Creativity as ResistanceTech Trends (60)4, 309-312.

Bridging the theory/practice gap: Ambigrams, quotes, posters & more…

theory-practice.001

Theoretically there should a reciprocal relationship between Theory and Practice – but it is the gap that every academic bemoans. This posting is prompted not by any particular insight into these matters but rather to share a set of visuals (ambigrams, memes, whatever…) that I created over the past day or so. This was prompted by a conversation about this with Danah Henriksen – so some blame / credit should go to her. (I prefer her getting the blame and all the credit coming to me, but she, and you, may disagree.)

To start with up on top is the standard image – the arrows representing how practice ought to inform theory and vice versa. As Immanuel Kant never said (but should have), “Experience without theory is blind, but theory without experience is mere intellectual play.” So to celebrate this reciprocal, transactional relationship here is an ambigram for these two words, reading “research” one way and “practice” when rotated 180 degrees!practice-theorytheory-practice

This of course allows me to recreate the two-arrow diagram up above with a new image that can be read even when rotated 180 degrees!!Continue reading →

Handbook of TPACK for Educators, 2nd Edition

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The TPACK framework, as we know it today, was first introduced to the world in 2006 in an article in TCRecord (Mishra & Koehler, 2006). An important part of the story of the success of the framework was the publication of The handbook of technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPCK) for educators by AACTE and Routledge. Matt and I wrote an introductory chapter for that (see Koehler & Mishra, 2008).

Over the past decade the amount of research into TPACK has grown exponentially… and so it was time for the 2nd edition of the handbook (citation and more information below).

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Rich TPACK Cases: Great Resource Book

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The TPACK framework is a theoretical framework that seeks to influence practice. And most gratifyingly (for Matt Koehler and myself) it appears to have had a significant impact in that area. That said, the field lacked concrete, rich examples of TPACK in practice. Cases that would (quoting Darling-Hammond & Snyder) “add context to theory” highlighting the rich telling detail, as well as local contextual factors that are often lost when teaching is discussed in more general terms.

This gap has now been filled with a lovely ebook by my friends and colleagues Mark Hofer, Lynn Bell and Glen Bull. The Practitioner’s guide to technology pedagogy and content knowledge (TPACK): Rich media cases of teacher knowledge focuses on developing rich “exemplary” cases of practice, and boy does it deliver. Consider what is included in each of the cases included in the book:

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Systems view of creativity & an interview with Michele Root-Bernstein

Our series of articles related to the broad topic of Rethinking technology and creativity for the 21st century in the journal TechTrends continues with two new articles. The first focuses on developing a systems view of creativity, specifically on how technology is opening up the world and changing systems of creativity.

Henriksen, D., & Hoelting, M. (2016). A Systems View of Creativity in a YouTube World. Tech Trends. (60)2. 102-106

The next article (reference and link below) makes a shift in our focus for the next few articles in the series. For the foreseeable future we will be focusing these articles on interviews with scholars and researchers on creativity. Through these interviews we seek to introduce their work and ideas to a wider population as well as connect their work to the themes we have been developing in this series so far. The first article in this new initiative is an interview with independent creativity scholar Michele Root-Bernstein.

Keenan, S., Mishra, P., & the Deep-Play Research Group (2016). Practicing the Process with Dr. Michele Root-BernsteinTech Trends (60)3, 200-203.

 

TPACK Newsletter #27, March 2016

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TPACK Newsletter, Issue #27: March 2016
Special Spring 2016 Conference Issue

Below please find a listing of TPACK-related papers/sessions that will be presented at the SITE conference in March in Savannah, Georgia; at the AERA annual meeting in April in Washington, DC; and at the ISTE conference in June in Denver, Colorado. (That’s 66 TPACK-related conference sessions in just 3 months!)

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TPACK Newsletter #26, February 2016

TPACK BUTTON

TPACK Newsletter, Issue #26: February 2016

Welcome to the twenty-sixth edition of the (approximately bimonthly) TPACK Newsletter! TPACK work is continuing worldwide. This document contains recent updates to that work that we hope will be interesting and useful to you, our subscribers.

If you are not sure what TPACK is, please surf over to http://www.tpack.org/ to find out more.

Gratuitous Quote About Knowledge

“Information is not knowledge.”
– Albert Einstein

In This Issue
-1. Gratuitous Quote About Technology
0. In This Issue (You are here.)
1. TPACK Newsletter Update
2. Recent TPACK Publications
3. Recent TPACK-Related Dissertations
4. Recent TPACK-Related Presentations
5. TPACK Newsletter Suggested Citation
6. Learning and Doing More with TPACK
–. Un-numbered miscellaneous stuff at the end

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Good-Evil Ambigram in Pub Med!

My Good-Evil oscillation ambigram design is easily one of my most popular designs – having made it to multiple publications, websites, covers of magazines, on the TV Show Brain Gamesand now it has made its way into a medical research journal Frontiers of Physiology in an article on (of all things), cardiac remodeling. You can read the actual article on Pub Med (link and reference below). good-evil-cleanedup2-300x130

Spaich, S., Katus, H.A., Backs, J. (2015, July 22). Ongoing controversies surrounding cardiac remodeling: is it black and white-or rather fifty shades of gray? Frontiers in Physiology (6)202. doi: 10.3389/fphys.2015.00202.

And this is how they describe their reason for including this design.

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Momentary Lapis Lazuli of Reason: Academia for better or verse

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Graduate school can be a grind. Academia can be dull and dreary. But not if poetry and parody are brought into the mix. This is a volume of academic poetry titled Momentary Lapis Lazuli of Reason: Academia for better of verse. The poems in this volume are the collective creation of students and faculty in the EPET program at MSU, created over email and lunch breaks; during class meetings and grading assignments; between procrastinating on starting that class paper or finishing off that long over-due journal article. It is somewhat of a miracle that this book even exits.

We have stolen from the best, selecting some of the most famous and iconic examples of English language poetry and rewriting them from an academic and scholarly perspective. As we write in the introduction:

On these pages are adaptations of poems that will make Emily Dickinson lose hope and William Shakespeare think that there is something rotten in the state of academia. Edgar Allen Poe will scream “Nevermore” and Robert Frost will give his head a shake, to ask if there is some mistake. To take these wonderful poems and rewrite them—to use the most beautiful works of the English language to describe the shenanigans of graduate committees—seems almost a silly travesty. Maybe that was the point.

It has been a labor of fun, as we hope that you enjoy reading these poems as much as we enjoyed created them. You will also find, interspersed in between the poems, photographs taken by students and faculty, just in case you thought that all we could do is write bad poetry.

Deep-Play & the Engaged Scholar

engaged-scholar-cover

The Engaged Scholar is a magazine published by MSU’s Office of University Outreach and Engagement with the goal of celebrating “Michigan State University’s ongoing partnership with Michigan, our nation, and our world.” I just got the 10th anniversary issue in the mail and was pleased to find an article about the MSU Museum and their collaborations with faculty across the university—with a specific mention of my exhibition (Deep-Play: Creativity in Math and Art through Visual Wordplay).  I don’t have a PDF of the article at this time but below is a photo of the spread – click to get a larger view.

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Episteme6 @ Mumbai: 2 presentations

episteme6

This past December I was at the epiSTEME 6 conference in Mumbai. It was jointly  organized by the Homi Bhaba Center for Science Education, TIFR and the Interdisciplinary Program in Educational Technology, IIT Bombay. I presented two papers there, oneabout the work being done by the Deep-Play group in the area of aesthetics and learning in the STEM disciplines and the other on the work we are doing with MSUrbanSTEM in Chicago.

The slides and papers from the proceedings for both these talks can be found below…

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The Deep-Play Group & our robotic overlords

The Deep-Play research group started as an informal group of faculty and graduate students at Michigan State University, mostly my advisees. It has now grown to include Arizona State University and a couple of people there. Of course my advisees include doctoral students who are in the face to face program as well as those in the hybrid PhD program.

What this means is that conducting shared meetings is challenging at many levels (scheduling, engaging in discussion one-on-one or one-to-many and so on). We have over time tried a variety of solutions—skype, zoom and now robots!

The CEPSE/COE Design Studio at  just created a video about the use of these robots by our research group. You can see it here. Enjoy.

Creativity in mathematics and beyond: New article

mathdance

Our series of articles related to the broad topic of Rethinking technology and creativity for the 21st century in the journal TechTrends continues with a new article on creativity in mathematics. This article focuses on the 4 winners of the 2014 Fields medal (one of the highest honors in mathematics and a recognition from one’s peers of highly influential and creative work).  Complete reference and link below:

Mehta, R., Mishra, P., & Henriksen, D., & the Deep-Play Research Group (2016). Creativity in mathematics and beyond — Learning from Fields medal winners. Tech Trends (59)7